Trash the dress

D and I have just finished watching this amazing “Trash the dress” video. Although I am planning to keep my wedding dress for my future daughter or granddaughter, I must admit, this is AWESOME! The hotdog scene in particular :)

 

It was filmed by the amazing crew from Still Motion. So really, that says it all.

 

Frances + James TTD – Times Square + Coney Island from stillmotion on Vimeo.

Comments (9)

  • I’ve noticed Trash the Dress becoming more and more popular. I don’t see myself ever wearing a poofy traditional dress but rather something more simple and “rewearable” but this seems so fun!

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  • After we get married, I’m hoping to do a TTD shoot of some sort.

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  • Alex, this is a gorgeous movie. Do you know much about video recording and editing?

    One of the things I’ve been always confused about is how movie-makers make the colors so vivid—is this post processing or the camera? For example, the shot at 3:17 is not something I could ever duplicate on a photo camera. The bright neon lights, dark blacks, and white dress I can’t figure out how a single exposure on a camera could capture.

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  • I don’t know why this really got to me–so beautiful!

    xo

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  • Hi. I’m a first-time visitor to your blog from Cleveland, OH. I was reading Candice’s “That’s Tangly” blog and saw the award you gave her. So I decided to click-through and check your blog out. And after reading a few posts, I decided to comment.

    And yes, the video was way cool.

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  • @Phill – The enhancing of the colors, contrast and other adjustments are almost always done in post processing, and it’s called color grading. The professional digital video cameras record movies in RAW mode, which is uncompressed and retains all the details in the frames. The consumer ones and the DSLR, which is what stillmotion used for making that video – a Canon 5D mark II – compress the movies in the same way a regular camera produces a compressed JPEG file. While the result from the camera might look good, it is more difficult to do corrections in post on a compressed image/movie because some detail is lost. A technique to counter this problem is to actually de-enhance the video in the camera, to lower the contrast and color saturation to reasonable values so that there’s more room for adjustments in post-processing.

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  • D: I’d like to learn more about this color-grading technique, to a level suitable for editing small amateur videos. Do you know of good web references?

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  • Phil: I think the first step would be to get some software that can do a decent job. For example, Magic Bullet Mojo comes with quite some nice presents: http://www.redgiantsoftware.com/products/all/mojo/
    I don’t know any particular good tutorial but I am sure there are plenty out there. My approach is to experience with fine tuning all the different settings until I get something that I like.

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  • I love it!!

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